So....what is supposed to look like? The irons and the red dot are supposed to work INDEPENDENTLY of one another and NOT together. Where most people get it wrong is they try to use both concurrently as if the dot was an addition to the sight picture. If the irons fell off you would still be able to shoot and hit, and if the dot fell off you would still be able to shoot and hit. Some people have the irons so low that there is no way on earth they could possibly use them when the dot is attached. The irons, properly installed are tall enough to be used independently of the red dot. How you see it in the images is how they are best used. Those who disagree with the concept simply do not know what they do not know. The irons are used to - 1). Train the eye to find the dot faster. It helps if they are both - dot and irons zeroed to the same POI 2). Help verify that the dot has... Read more →

The hardest gap to traverse in the OODA (Observe, Orient, Decide, Act) cycle is the stretch from D to A…or decision to action. There seems to be an innate second guess system built in that slows most people down. At a certain level, this is a good thing as it prevents over reaction. However, it is not that “second guess” matter that seems to retard the speed of our act. Rather it is the timing of the Decision, the selection of the correct action, and then the execution of that action. So we are looking at timing, choosing, and executing. Imagine this situation. A good guy sees the bad guy. He notices how he looks, his positioning in relation to everything, as well as his body language and anything that he is currently doing. The observation is inevitably tied to profiling. We almost do both simultaneously. So our good guy profiles him as a bad guy based on his appearance, demeanor, location, and all the other factors that are incoming as information. These two phases of observation and orientation (perhaps... Read more →

Jeff Cooper once said, "The Rifle is the Queen of Weapons". This was of course in reference to the chess piece that can do anything well, and to the surpassing of all other pieces. And it is in that vein that I try and make my rifle program a complete presentation of the rifle and not simply a "long range" school, or a "CQB" school. Rather we wish to address everything that a rifle can do. And incidentally, I do not go along with the notion that a 308 is a rifle and a 223 is a carbine. All my rifles are rifles...regardless of caliber. And since my focus in studying the rifle is from an anti-personnel point of view, all my rifles are assault much as that may annoy the liberals and frustrate the gun apologists. Unlike the pistol or the shotgun (sort of), the rifle is not a defensive weapon. The rifle is for attack and assault. It exists to allow the user to project force and enforce his will on his adversaries. Hardly the "sporting artifact"... Read more →

We run more students through our training courses than most other private sector training organizations in the USA. As such we see a very good cross-section of what the level of skill is across the nation. And by skill, I am referring to the ability to hit a target on demand at various distances, and from various situationally adapted positions. On point we constantly have to fix in our students is the management of the trigger. They stay off the trigger until the last possible moment and then they jump onto that trigger and slap it for a brief instant only to quickly move off trigger again. It is as if an instructor at some point along their formative development convinced them that the trigger was like a hot stove and that it would burn them to the bone if they lingered upon its surface. An analogy that some readers may understand is the novice driver that is afraid of the gas pedal and that stays off it for as long as possible and then is either flooring it or... Read more →

I first began working with what is called “Appendix Carry” when two things happened concurrently. I jammed up my right shoulder doing overhead presses in the gym, and I began to work in some ground fighting Jujitsu into the skill sets (I hate ground fighting, but you never know right?) I had normally carried in the traditional 4:00/5:00 position, but now found my shoulder got very sore reaching back there. You know the story the doc tells you when you tell him it hurts to do something right? He usually says, “well stupid…don’t do that”. Moving the pistol forward of the hip fixed that right away. The other issue was that if I was fighting someone on the ground, it was exceedingly difficult to reach back to grab a pistol that was sandwiched between the ground and my body. Yet Appendix Carry still allowed me to do so. When we tried Appendix carry in our force on force drills we also found that it is very fast to draw from - faster than traditional strong side or crossdraw. And mind... Read more →