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November 2015
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February 2016

January 2016

The problem with the MOS pistols, and the CORE, and all other imminent introductions of the same concept by other major manufacturers is this. Their main objective is not to present the most efficient method of mounting a red dot sight to a handgun. To the contrary, it is to offer a platform that will appeal to everyone that wants to do so. So rather than design the system to accept a Trijicon RMR, or A Leupold Deltapoint Pro, exclusively, they all compromised in the mounting system to be all things to all shooters. The reason for that is certainly not because it is better. It is not better. The reason was to sell more pistols. I get calls all the time about putting a low cost sight on slides. I politely tell them that we do not do that because not all red dot sights are created equal and not all of them are suitable for a handgun. And to design a handgun to accept all of them…even the cheap or unsuitable ones, may be a wise marketing move... Read more →


Any gun will hit COM at ten yards...but our goal is retinal shots at that distance. Nuances in grip, how you sights, what portion of the eye you use to see the sights/dot, visual acuity, all contribute in the same way that a rifle zeroed for one man will not be perfectly zeroed for the next man. The iron sights do in fact have to be zeroed if you want something more than point shooting at an auto shop restroom. In class I have seen new pistols with the sights off for anything more than 10 yard COM shooting. Zeroing involves adjusting them for windage and elevation with YOUR MEAT AMMO at a given distance. Most important is windage. That can be done by drifting the rear sight. Elevation is not as crucial, but that can be done by shaving small amounts off the front sight or replacing the front sight. The zero will not be the same with Tula or WWB. I tell guys - zero for killing ammo, but note where your training ammo hits. Zeroing for training... Read more →


On the face of it, the title seems obvious. Sort of like saying water is wet. But it is something that must be discussed in the realm of combat shooting as there seems to be a great deal of the "complacent quest for adequacy" creeping into the study. "Its good enough for gunfighting", one man may say as he views his pizza sized group on the cardboard, not taking into consideration that what he is viewing was not the result of an hour of busting off the x in reactive drills...but rather his best in non-pressured proactive group shooting. The combat crowd might scoff at our standards of all shots touching as an indicator of accuracy (both of man and gun and ammo). But the more accurate the shooter is, and the more accurate his weapon is, the greater a margin for error he has if things are less than optimal when he has to shoot. Think of a custom pistol that is capable of all shots touching at ten yards, compared to a pistol of lesser development that is... Read more →


Back in the 1980s the triggers on SIGs and Berettas and S&Ws were heavier than today...or maybe we are stronger today. I don't know. I came to the DA Semi Auto from the DA Revolver so the first shot was not a big deal to me. One rolled through the trigger in one continual and constant motion on the way out and the shot broke just as the last sight verification was made. But we did work on those DA triggers quite a bit both in dry work and in the gunsmith shop. I tracked down a relatively unknown 'smith named Steve Deladio who ran the Armory at Long Beach Uniforms. He tuned my S&W 686 to ridiculous smoothness and when I used the S&W 5906 I did the same. Steve gave it a fantastic double action pull that could be rolled through like the best revolvers. I never knew that the first shot was so "difficult", or that the transition from double action to single action was such a "problem" until I attended Gunsite and was told as much.... Read more →


1) Human beings are bigger and stronger today than at any other time in history due to advanced nutrition, the social prevalence of weight lifting and the popularity of contact and martial sports. Any casual perusal of military museums will reveal that the average male was much smaller as close as a couple of generations ago. 2) The prevalence of tactical pharmacology, both legal and illegal is far more common and refined today than in the past. Substances from methamphetamines and cocaine to excessive HGH and similar substances give rise to mental attitudes of invincibility. 3) Proliferation of body armor. While ammunition has progressed dramatically in the last decade, so has the availability of protection from that ammunition. Today the technology of body armor has developed to the point that even an assault rifle may be defeated. Armor has always been common, and even back in 1991, one of my gunfights involved armored suspects. 4) Finally, the reality of today shows that the adversary might be a Jihadist, or other terrorist, and not just the uneducated urban sloth seeking to... Read more →