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November 2017

By Eric Tull A Suarez International Force on Force class is the single best class you can take to quickly improve your gunfighting skills. Simply put, it’s the closest you can come to real gunfight without having bullets whiz past your ear. But it’s true that the airsoft gear requirements and unconventional nature of the class can be a bit intimidating for potential students. To help overcome this, I’ve put together this guide to ensure new students get the most out of their first FoF class—and all the ones they take after that. (Because after you’ve taken one, there’s no going back.) GEAR YOU’LL NEED Quality Airsoft Gun and Magazines After taking a weekend off and spending good money on a class, you don’t want to have to sit out because your gear doesn’t work. You’ll need a quality gas-powered airsoft pistol. Do your own research on airsoft brands, but Tokyo Marui and KWA/KSC are an excellent starting point. You’ll also want three magazines for the gun, so you won’t have to reload as often (and also because magazines are... Read more →


At the risk of starting another caliber war, I want to answer a question that several members have asked. In essence: Why would we pick a 9mm like the Glock PDW or an AR-15 in 9mm when we can have a 5.56x45? Well...it is a valid question and I will give my perspective on this based on 32 years of experience going into harm's way as well as teaching those who go into harm's way. Every weapon is a special weapon with a specific application. There are no weapons that handle every possible combat task equally well, and any choice is an exercise in compromise. While we all have personal preferences, the professional, or professionally-minded enthusiast should not have a "favorite weapon". Rather he should be skilled at a variety of weapons so that given some forethought and planning, he can select the best tool for the job. Now lets recall the concept of the PDW and its pseudo-official definition: A personal defense weapon (PDW) is a class of compact magazine-fed, self-loading, hybrid between a submachine gun and a carbine.... Read more →


The method most basic, for using a Night Vision Monocular in conjunction with a handgun goes like this. Hold the monocular in your support side hand and bring it up to your non-dominant eye. How close will be up to you, but understand that there is a glow given off by the unit and holding too far away will not only illuminate your face but also reduce your visual acuity through the unit. Adjust the optic so you can hold it as close as possible. This will remain in place as you move through the area. It is suggested that you attach a neck lanyard so that if you needed both hands free you could drop it on the lanyard and instantly be able to operate whatever you needed with the support hand without loss of the unit. When moving, you can bring the pistol into a compressed ready such as SUL, or a modification of SUL. This allows you to move efficiently without excessive exertion, or projection of the pistol into unknown areas. The main point to remember is... Read more →


The city had been stalked by a rapist. This guy was good. We thought he was an ex-military guy or an ex-cop. He left no physical evidence, and managed to hit every night for the last ten days regardless of how many units had been deployed to the area and how many days off had been cancelled.But it was not hard to avoid those “high profile” patrols. They drove around giving a very good, and loud, rendition of the “illusion of security”. That was the modern administration’s answer to violence – to look like you were really trying hard until the bad guy got tired and went away .I had been out on foot in the alley. One of those coincidences of happenstance and good preparation I suppose. There had been a call of a suspicious person, right where I was on foot. Initially, I thought a resident had seen me moving through the alley. I had a plain black raid jacket with the “POLICE” lettering sufficiently and purposely worn off so it covered all the shiny bullshit I was... Read more →


Gunfighting has always been an ongoing study. There are innovations being made constantly, both in the tactical (aka skills) and technical (aka gear) areas. It is a mistake to focus exclusively on one, and ignore the other. For example, one may have very good night combat skills, but his ability to apply will be severely limited if all he has is a 5 shot J frame with a mini maglite. On the other hand, a man with a PVS-14 and an IR laser that has no tactical skills will not fare any better. The key then is to have the technical to match the tactical. And when one considers that the tactical is more easily improved than the technical, it makes sense to start with the best kit possible, and then grow into it. One strong concern for many has always been the "fight at night" thing. Like all conflicts we can divide them into reactive and proactive. We can typify the "reactive" event as follows. You are walking to your car in a dimly lit parking lot at 11:00... Read more →


I personally have participated in no less than a half dozen gunfights in reduced light. For 15 years, with few exceptions, I worked between 1700 HRS and 0500 HRS. And I hunted bad guys in buildings and in the street. When I discuss this low light problem, I speak from personal experience. But we are not here to discuss me. The article on using weapon lights was been read quite a few times and it seems to polarize the reader. They either agree with my position, or they question my sanity. The gun world, like most of American society lives in a world of extremes. Everything is either black, or it is white. An all or nothing perspective that is never like life. Extremes only occur at the 1% on either end of the spectrum. Everything in the middle is fluid, and taking the position that life must be "always or never", is an extremely limiting position. It is however a position parroted by many intellectually slothful trainers who cannot grasp (or perhaps their students cannot grasp), that reality is... Read more →


You heard them moving through the house. Anytime someone is attempting to maneuver in stealth against you, you can guess that their intentions are bad. And you did just that, arming yourself with your Glock. The light you added made you feel safer operating in low light, and that article you read said that all gunfights happened in the dark. You kept both hands on the Glock, just like on the range, and it helped steady the pistol through the waves of adrenaline. Remember, you told yourself - target identification is the most important thing so use the light. Not wanting to shoot an innocent, you had turned the light on with your support hand as you began to move through the house and - End of story - the bad guys saw your light and sent a magazine of ammunition your way. One of the thirty rounds hit you in the head and you died. Let's try again shall we? You heard them moving through the house. Anytime someone is attempting to maneuver in stealth against you, you can... Read more →


There are a couple of points we must make at the beginning of this discussion. First: Nothing is perfect, and nothing is free. All weapons and sighting systems are designed and fabricated by men and anything man-made can, under certain circumstances, fail or malfunction. Certainly, more robust systems could be made, but everything is driven by the desire for profits. Something absolutely damage and failure proof could be made, but the cost would undoubtedly limit the market. Second: One is none, two is one. And by extension, three is better than two. Redundancy may be undesirable in conversations and essay’s, but not in weaponry or safety systems. The topic of this discussion is the laser. And more completely, its role and application today, in 2017, in the heyday of the red dot equipped pistol. It is interesting to note that many in the gun community foolishly polarize themselves into the “either – or” camps. But in reality, we will see that like the Reese’s commercial, they are two great things that work great together. Both systems will offer an easier... Read more →


First iteration - proof of concept. Aimpoint Micro in dovetail mount. September 2009 Version two - Trijicon RMR milled into the slide - no rear sight - February 2010 Spring 2010 - Use of Lone Wolf and Caspian Slides. Note dummy RMR body. Yeah...we looked at sight placement this way and dropped it as substandard. Unhappy with the QC of those slides, we decided to make our own. Summer of 2011. The version one slides while we were TSD Combat Systems - 2012 Next iteration - modernized design, PVD finishes, and our own Suarez Sights. We carried this one OCONUS a few times. The very first Red Dot Pistol Class ever taught in the world - Prescott, AZ December 2011 Suarez plankowner Jon Payne with none other than fighting great Royce Gracie receiving his Suarez Glock. Always onward - The Guttersnipe 17 next to a standard Suarez Glock. All Suarez parts. 5th Group Operator with a Suarez holster and Slide. The Spec Ops and SWAT communities were early adopters. The ultimate expression of the modern concealed carry combat pistol. Much... Read more →