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January 2018

February 2018

One of the teaching points at the Killing Within The Law Seminar was that after the shots had been fired, you would have to explain yourself. Regardless of what the untested, myth-followers, on the internet will tell you, you cannot just say nothing. If a police officer responds to your shooting, he sees the body, and you refusing to speak to him, he will arrive at certain conclusions. He doesn't care about you, or the truth, or any of that. He cares about not having his Sergeant on his ass, and in getting off duty on time. And there will be a report written. Once that report is written, it will require the hand of God Himself to change it, so it is in your interest to select your role in the event. The role you want is "Victim". That role will be self-assigned if you conduct yourself properly and use your words to reinforce what is evident to the officers. A great deal of that is based on non-verbal things. A perceived gentleman will be seen in a vastly... Read more →


Some points to state right off the bat. 1). We do not multi-task very well under normal conditions. Under physically stressful conditions even less. That is not say we get stupid, but the more one task demands of you, physically, or with regards to attention, the less likely it is other tasks will be successful. This is not the case in controlled situations, but when there is a loss of control of outcomes, there is great difficulty in dividing up your focus and degree of attention to details not pertinent to the primary situation. In such situations, the simpler and more "caveman" the execution, the better. Thus we default to gross motor skills as much as possible and eliminate the need for analytical solutions dependent on fine motor dexterity as much as possible. 2). Although not as bad the third or fourth times out, the first time at the gunfight is generally quite spectacular. Adrenaline will be flowing and the easiest tasks will be difficult. And understand what I refer to as a "gunfight". I refer to the one that... Read more →


"After the battle - tighten the helmet straps" Old Samurai Maxim It is strange to me, how modern people think. They seem to have the attention span of chickens going from one seed to another. Last October, not five months ago, the Las Vegas shooting broke all the records. I will bet that not five out of ten people you stop on the street even remember it. And yesterday, seventeen killed at a high school. This morning everyone is running around like those chickens I discussed earlier...looking for their seed or their kernel of corn. But with the passage of time, all tensions are relaxed...and the blood lessons...and the focus...goes away and are replaced with the search for comfort. And soon...we will see another one. 1). Prevention. Sorry kids, you can't and you won't. No matter how many fences and guards you place temporarily. I suspect it was already illegal for Cruz to walk into the school with a rifle intent on murder. So much for the rules. In a free society you cannot detain people for what they may... Read more →


One of the things that is incessantly being discussed in the CCW/LEO community is the after-event-discourse. In other words, what do you say...or not, after you have shot and killed an adversary. As expected, the variety of advice is as different as people's choices in guns and ammo. A prevailing attitude - promulgated by the liability-mongers - is to simply shut up and say nothing under any circumstances. I disagree and here is why - I have been in more than a few of these and also investigated quite a few of these. I noted some trends and tried to use those trends to my benefits when it was my turn at the plate. First is the fact that you are the only one equipped to tell your story. The bad guys you shot, if they survive, will not be "keeping quiet". They will be telling the police you pulled your gun on them, perhaps create some appearance of racism if they can exploit it, and generally make it look like you are the over-reacting bad guy. If the police... Read more →


When we turn to the use of the shotgun in a combative, gunfighting application, we have to deal with the same issues. And I understand those issues well as I always felt better with more ammunition. But the issue we see with the shotgun which we do not see with other weapon platforms is the desire to keep that ammunition on the weapon itself. I don't dislike the idea of having some ammunition on the shotgun, but not if it compromises its handiness and utility. A shotgun is not a high volume of fire weapon. It is not intended to take part in an infantry maneuver under fire, nor to compete with a drum-fed SAW. The shotgun finds its utility in the same distance intervals the pistol does. It is a close and fast deployment weapon, and each press of the trigger has potentially the same effect as half a magazine of pistol ammo fired en mass. Think about this for a moment. Eight rounds of pistol ammo has about the same effect on a human torso as one round... Read more →