Previous month:
July 2018
Next month:
September 2018

August 2018

People want to do what is fun. If it is not fun or entertaining, they tend to avoid it. As a result, they will get good at the fun thing only. That describes perfectly the state of gun skills in the world today. Shooters is how they identify themselves and the act of sending bullets downrange into cardboard or steel, sometimes for a score, is how their pursuit is measured. And there is nothing wrong with that if that is the end goal itself. But if the objective is fighting skill, that is a very incomplete process. It is like a race driver only turning left in a big circle and thinking he is a great pursuit driver, in traffic. Or a cardio kickboxing advocate throwing a flurry of punches into the bag (while the score from Rocky plays in the background) declaring himself ready for a street fight. Not quite. In fact, not anywhere close. What is missing? Let me make a list. 1). Context in relation to an enemy. A piece of immobile steel or stationary cardboard is... Read more →


We offer a service where we will zero and inspect a customer's weapon. I also make it a practice to zero every custom pistol or pistol package that leaves HQ. So once a week I load the Company Tahoe with targets and ammo and head off into the weeds of the AZ back country. It is a great time for me as i am away from the office and the sometimes daunting CEO duties that tend to weigh during the week. This last outing once I was done with filming and a few personal training drills I brought out and zeroed each pistol. Shop Monkey had also given me a Glock 43 we had installed a Shield RMS on that the customer had issues zeroing. "Hmm. OK, no worries", I thought. This will be an easy finish. I set up a new target...loaded up the 43 and - BAM I had an AD. I call them AD by the way, not the popular self-flagellating ND because many times it really is the weapon. The AD went right where I was... Read more →


I am old enough to remember my first duty shotgun at LASD. It was an Ithaca 12 gauge. The stock had been cut down as had the barrel. It was handy and it was fast owing to its balance and its well-worn action. And I recall the old deputy that trained us in skipping buckshot off the concrete range at the Wayside training range. He relayed some tall tales about taking rioters out at the knees during the first iteration of the LA Riots held in Watts. I later learned that what I initially thought were exaggerations, were pure fact and the deputy had personal experience dropping about ten rioters that way. In those days, the spread of the pattern and lack of reach of the shotgun was seen as a huge asset by the law men that carried it into urban harm's way. Sometime after that, the shotgun fell out of favor. It began when the Gunsite crew began trying to turn the weapon into a rifle, and tighten the pattern to the point where any benefit of the... Read more →


I think that we have entered into an era where everybody thinks they already know everything, and the study of gunfighting is no different. The way to use the pistol's trigger to its greatest utility is not up for debate, opinions, or discussions. The trigger's use is determined by its design. A 1911 trigger is different from that on a Beretta 92. And a Glock trigger is different still. The trigger that comes on a mass produced factory pistol will never be optimal, but it will generally be safe. But safe is relative and overachievers want better...but better within reason. Lets look at its phases and what constitutes the better trigger systems available to you on a combat pistol today. Trigger Take-Up (also referred to as Pre-Travel) Take-Up is any movement of the trigger toward you that does not cause the sear or striker to move and does not engage the mainspring. Take-up is most evident in a two stage trigger. The initial movement from the resting position up to the point where you feel resistance is Take-Up. The point... Read more →


I want to discuss a topic we see with dogs, but has rarely been ever used to describe humans in conflict. That is Fear Aggression. Look at the two images above. Before reading the rest of the article look at them and see the differences in demeanor, posture, emotion, as well as the outward manifestation of those emotions. On the left we see a small dog baring his teeth. If a picture could have sound you could almost hear the little growl coming from the little throat rolling into a full blow little bark. The little dog is afraid and if he was a human, we would say he was emotional, upset, and loudly acting out those emotions. A fear aggressive dog is dangerous because he is unpredictable and uncontrollable and his fear will lead him to bite even if biting is not what is called for...and even then, those bites will be applied hesitantly and poorly. On the right we see a wolf on the stalk. Look at the image again. There is no fear in the wolf, no... Read more →


We recall the drill. The kill-house instructor briefed you on the radio call. "Shots fired, homicide in progress in a home, multiple victims down, suspect is a male white - 40 - wearing a red hoodie, white pants and sunglasses. Armed with a handgun" Then he said, "Hurry - back up is thirty minutes out", as he tapped you on the back. Then as you go into the kill-house (oh wait...never mind, they renamed it a few years earlier to "shoot house"...cant be training killers dontchaknow)...then as you move into the "shoot" house you are met with a myriad of no-shoot targets depicting children, nuns, and women with terrified looks positioned as if fleeing the evil man whom you were told was in the process of killing everyone. Then as you clear a corner you see the red hoodie, and the man fitting the description in the purposely dimmed (but not too dim) light, holding his hand outstretched with something metallic in it - as if holding a firearm. He is pointing it at your face and you realize the... Read more →


When Suarez International began the study of the Red Dot Pistol in 2009 I had no idea that it would become such a popular and mainstream idea. And yet today, almost a decade later, we are seeing more pistols with red dots than pistols without them. I predict that it will be a rare thing to see a pistol in a combatant’s holster that does not have a red dot as a sighting system. However what invariably happens is a desire to shortcut the system, and to get the benefits on the cheap. With that we see the proliferation of low quality red dot sights mounted on pistols. And by “low quality” I mean sights whose greatest attribute is that they are cheap. But “cheap” never brings quality. Now I understand very well that not everybody can drop $500 on an optic but an optic on a handgun that will be carried 24-7 in a holster is vastly different than an optic on a rifle that will sit in the safe until the weekend. Weapons meant for fighting (or “self-defense”... Read more →