CONCEALED CARRY Feed

I worked for fifteen years in Southern California Law Enforcement. During those years I worked Night Patrol, SWAT, Narcotics (Raids as well as UC work), Gang Unit, and any dangerous detail I could find. I was in alot of shootings. But I pointed guns and yelled at many more bad guys than I ever shot. So in this thread I will discuss the gunpoint dialog...or what to say...and whether you should say anything at all. If he has already shot people, and there is no doubt about what is happening, skip all of this and just shoot him. You will thank me when you are 80. So will your yet-to-be-born kids and grandkids. And so will the supermodel –wife you have not yet met. What in God's earth is so hard to understand about that I do not get. First, I want to point out that unless your adversary is some criminal incarnation of Mister Rogers, he is not afraid of you. He has contempt for you and everything you hold important. And more...your life and that of your family... Read more →


Instructors that teach yelling out warnings prior to shooting - when the events have clearly identified the bad guy shooter - are idiots. Yes, I said it and I stand by what I said. And I have the real world experience to back up my position. Students who have been trained that way - get that stupidity out of your minds right now, and get your minds right. We have discussed this before. The first time was about twelve years ago on this blog with regards to the Tacoma Mall shooting. Tacoma Mall Shooting - 2005 It was back in 2005, at the Tacoma Mall in Washington state. A civilian CCW guy named McKown heard the gunshots. Gun in hand, McKown scanned for the shooter. As the gunshots stopped, McKown tucked his pistol back under his coat. We later learned that was when the shooter was reloading. McKown said, "Young man, I think you need to put your weapon down." The shooter shot McKown, hitting his spine and paralyzing him for life. And From today's headlines - Congressman Scalise Assassination... Read more →


“To each there comes in their lifetime a special moment when they are figuratively tapped on the shoulder and offered the chance to do a very special thing, unique to them and fitted to their talents. What a tragedy if that moment finds them unprepared or unqualified for that which could have been their finest hour.” Winston Churchill My own comments: Fortunate are those who are tapped on the shoulder once. Blessed are they who are tapped multiple times. Read more →


The birth of our reactive shooting methods began on a cold and rainy December night, in 1991. It was December 7th, the 50th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor...it was cold, and raining, and I felt like crap. I had been fighting a cold for a week and it was finally taking hold. I remember standing over the phone, actually holding the receiver and debating whether to call in sick or not. (This was long before smart phones millenials would use today). As it turned out, I popped a couple of Day Quills and drove in to work. My plan was simple. I would get a nice hot Starbucks, a copy of the latest Investor's Business Daily and hang out in the heated car until I got a radio call. I was not in the mood for that "proactive police work" we hear about...not that day...not the way I felt. And it was all going according to plan too. Then at about 2345 HRS I got the call. "3L7 respond, any unit to assist, Armed Robbery in Progress,... Read more →


I was asked how the Suarez material differs from the Modern Technique invented/codified by Jeff Cooper. Here it is...a long read, but it sets down the historical context. I attended Gunsite in 1990. Cooper was there as were a few of the current "stalwarts" for the modern technique, a couple of SEALs and an entire group of LAPD SWAT with 1911s. I was running my issued weapon, as crappy as it was, a Smith & Wesson 5906 that had been tuned up by Steve Deladio in Long Beach, CA. While I was open minded, I did have some ideas about what was what since I had been working around criminals, gang members and killers for five years. I had not been in a gunfight yet, but I was around alot of guys who had. In the end, I got top score and won the shootoff, against all of those guys. Cooper and I became friends, and I attended Gunsite every year until 1995. So one could say I became well versed in the Modern Technique. In Cooper's words in the... Read more →


From the perception of safety comes the relaxation of standards, and then the rise of the acceptance of marginal performance as something adequate. Inevitably, the acceptance of mediocrity leads to its adherents defending their current state as normal and ridiculing those who do not wish to be held down by their low standards. Profound? No, simply an observation from life. It happens in police/military circles as well as in any industry and in society as well. We see it in the gun world…perhaps especially now that the specters of Hillary and Obama have passed into unpleasant history. It is as if now, some have glomed on to the illusion of safety from magazine bans, and assault rifle bans. And being safe from such things, it is almost - in their minds, as if evil itself has been driven out from the country. And they no longer need to maintain skills or maintain top grade equipment. Finally, they think, they can now be like “normal” people. Point out that we are still at war with Jihadists, and that the Urban Terrorist... Read more →


From our ground breaking "Killing Within The Law" series, we bring you the Flowchart of Deadly Force (aka The Flowchart of killing). Intended to simplify the ambiguities of street combat. Hesitation kills as is evident in any study of real world events. This will help avoid both hesitation as well as over reaction. Read more →


GEAR AND SKILL Posted today at warriortalk by "apamburn". Speaks exactly why having the best gear is important. "But most of all I think that adding and using the RMR on my handgun has emphasized something that Gabe and WT generally has espoused for a long time, but I didn't fully comprehend: basic equipment + new shooter : shooter may not notice limitations of basic equipment because the capabilities of equipment still exceed capabilities of shooter. basic equipment + good shooter : shooter will experience limitations because their capabilities are >= capabilities of equipment, and without change in equipment, development of skills will plateau, regress, or be retarded. great equipment + new shooter : shooter's capabilities limit what they can do but their abilities will far exceed what they could do with basic equipment, and learning curve cut (case in point: my non-shooter mom with suarez RMR and brace hitting barrel at 100 yds) great equipment + good shooter: shooter will get 'over the hump' and avoid skill plateau, identifying weaknesses and correct them; shooting capabilities enhanced (case in point:... Read more →


We run more students through our training courses than most other private sector training organizations in the USA. As such we see a very good cross-section of what the level of skill is across the nation. And by skill, I am referring to the ability to hit a target on demand at various distances, and from various situationally adapted positions. On point we constantly have to fix in our students is the management of the trigger. They stay off the trigger until the last possible moment and then they jump onto that trigger and slap it for a brief instant only to quickly move off trigger again. It is as if an instructor at some point along their formative development convinced them that the trigger was like a hot stove and that it would burn them to the bone if they lingered upon its surface. An analogy that some readers may understand is the novice driver that is afraid of the gas pedal and that stays off it for as long as possible and then is either flooring it or... Read more →