GABE SUAREZ ARTICLES Feed

Although the Glock (and its emulative systems such as the M&P and CZ P-10) tend to be the dominant pistols in the market, I am aware that not everyone selects or prefers it. I recently had a consulting contract where the shooters were using the SIG P226 (don't ask). And I have seen more and more police special units select that type of weapon, notably the CZ-75 and CZ P07. Is the DA pistol making a comeback? Maybe. Let's examine why that might be. And no...I am not going to sell all my Glocks. You are the weapon...your pistol is only a tool. And nobody says you can't have several tools. My first police semi-auto was a SIG P-226 way back in 1988. I shot Distinguished Expert with it and carried it for years. Later when the 3rd generation S&W was selected by the agency I worked with, I used that. It was like a rough Beretta 92. I took that weapon to Gunsite in 1990 and not only shot the top score in the class but won the shoot... Read more →


Is the Shield RMS or RMS-C the Trijicon-Killer? No, not at all. Neither is the Leupold Deltapoint for that matter. When we received the first RMS we installed it on a slide and ran it for a month in our testing. We carried it, we shot it, we used it in all sorts of ways a normal duty CCW weapon would be carried, and as a duty openly carried weapon would be carried an used. We did not abuse the weapon nor the optic. I will leave those S&M tactics to the clown princes of the gun world. I wrote up my findings in an article published on this blog and passed around in social media. Here is a more detailed description of my view on the Shield RMS. CHOOSING THE RIGHT RED DOT SIGHT 1). For a light to moderate duty optic to be carried concealed day-to-day, on a smaller sized pistol it is an excellent choice. Not the best choice however for a hard duty combat weapon that will be shot thousands of times per month and endure... Read more →


The old saying, "A picture is worth 1000 words" was as true the day the old sage spoke it in the Chinese temple as it is today. So take a moment and look at all these images. They are a collection of Islamic Terrorists in the process of murdering innocents in futherance of their political, ideological and religious aims. We did not have readily available images of Mateen or Farooq, but if we did, they would look very much like these guys. What are they armed with? Rifles. And look at the last image. That belongs to the CT Operators who eliminated one of the terrorists in Paris. Look at the shield they are using. Do you the impacts on the Bataclan Shield? What made those and why were they deploying a shield of that nature? The bad guys were armed with rifles. Now, I would like you to set aside ideas about fairness, the American way of things, and the way things ought to be and look for a moment with me at reality...they way things really are, and... Read more →


I was recently taken to task by a commenter on another blog because I do not use standards testing in my training courses. I don't, never have, and do not believe in them. Perhaps there are other instructors that have been wrestling with the same issue, so here are my reasons. You can agree or disagree, but nobody can argue that Suarez International is a success in the training world (internationally I may add), and that our students, both in and out of uniform, have not merely survived street fights, but won them outright. There is a difference between training and learning. Learning is what you do in class. Nobody wants to pay me $2000 per day to take them through endless drills, making mountains of spent brass, simply to reaffirm those skills they already possess. Nor would I be inclined to take their money for such a thing. But that is what many instructors do. They run their classes like an endless mass of drills because it is easy for them, does not require them to speak or form... Read more →


We live in a curious time. While the west has been at war for nearly two decades, most men still live in comfortable homes with few things lacking. And fewer have seen hardship...the sort of hardship that changes one's world view. And so they move through their lives inhabiting grown men's bodies, but with the emotions and mental toughness of kids. Toughness is something one builds and develops, not something one is given at birth. And toughness builds an emotional maturity that allows a man to control his emotions. We all have breaking points, but the breaking point if a tough man is farther down the road. Hemingway was once asked in a long ago magazine article to describe toughness or "guts". He said it was grace under pressure. Kipling wrote about it as well (and it is a sad and unfortunate thing that so few will have ever read either of these men) "If you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs and blaming it on you. If you can trust yourself when all men... Read more →


Novices concentrate on the "how" of something - Masters concentrate on the "why". You see it martial arts training all the time. Students in lines executing one movement or another, emulating the instructor. The same thing is seen in the firearms world. Lots of guys know "how" to - for example - reload the handgun, and they are spitting images of their instructor. But unless they understand "why" it is important to do it that way, they don't really know anything other than to mimic what somebody else has taught them. And it gets worse when that instructor didn't know either. Just as Karate's moves have applications that must be learned and understood, the same must be said about the far simpler martial science of pistol fighting. Often we will see somebody emulating a competition technique, or a technique that is workable only when you are a member of a team. The reasons for this usually end up with - "it looks cool". If that is the sum total of your goal in training - looking cool - or winning... Read more →


For the past few years we have mentioned the importance of mindlessness, or the ability to react skillfully, perfectly and spontaneously to a threat. We have also discussed the way to attain those skills, to develop the pattern-less/system-less ability to improvise to an unexpected event. Those attributes, by the way, are the keys to winning the reactive fight. I don't care how well or accurately you shoot. If you do not have the ability to move on demand, quickly and dynamically as you draw the weapon and counter attack, you will lose and you will die. We show that time and time again in our force on force sessions. In the reactive realm it is all about timing and about not getting shot. As we focused harder and deeper on the development of the gunfighter it became clearer that the method to get our gunfighters to the level we wanted them to be was not via more range training, nor more force on force. The methodology had been laid out a long time ago and it was something that some... Read more →