GABE SUAREZ ARTICLES Feed

I added considerable travel classes over the past two years and I must say that 2017 will be my last year doing “travel classes”. The pace of business today requires more of my time in the CEO’s chair and only classes at our home range in Prescott, AZ allow us to keep up with those demands. I will be leaving the road classes to my staff instructors. I am announcing five classes that I will be doing in Prescott next year and inviting students to enroll at a discounted price. The usual $500 has been reduced to $400 and will remain at that level for the rest of August. After the first of September, the price goes to full price of $500. These are the only classes I will be teaching in 2018. Those who have trained with me before will attest to the quality and value of this offer. Those in doubt, please read the thread on what makes our training different. I look forward to a great year of discovery and development of our gunfighters. SUAREZ PISTOL GUNFIGHTING... Read more →


A CLOSE RANGE GUNFIGHT

I am posting this so we can learn. There is always an antagonist view to posting things like this and we are criticized that we are unduly criticizing. But if we don't do this, mistakes, and there are always mistakes, will be repeated again and again. So lets watch this and see if we can discuss tactical things that we can learn from and do better should we find ourselves in such a situation. Read more →


On the face of it, the title seems obvious. Sort of like saying water is wet. But it is something that must be discussed in the realm of combat shooting as there seems to be a great deal of the "complacent quest for adequacy" creeping into the study. "Its good enough for gunfighting", one man may say as he views his pizza sized group on the cardboard, not taking into consideration that what he is viewing was not the result of an hour of busting off the x in reactive drills...but rather his best in non-pressured proactive group shooting. The combat crowd might scoff at our standards of all shots touching as an indicator of accuracy (both of man and gun and ammo). But the more accurate the shooter is, and the more accurate his weapon is, the greater a margin for error he has if things are less than optimal when he has to shoot. Think of a custom pistol that is capable of all shots touching at ten yards, compared to a pistol of lesser development that is... Read more →


Suarez International is at the leading edge of modern gunfight training. We will be expanding our reach across America and will be hiring up to a dozen new staff to do so. We are looking for fit and capable teachers to instruct civilian pistol students at various skill levels. Military and police experience is a plus, as is prior teaching experience. Our current staff are among the highest paid trainers in the nation. Interested parties please submit a short 2-3 minute video resume to info@suarezinternational.com Read more →


TORQUING FOR SIGHT SCREWS We tell the guys who ask to tighten "FINGER TIGHT". That means as tight as your man hands will allow. But the questions persist as well as guys leaving their sight screws looser than DC Opsec. So here we have the final word from the Dungeon. We did some testing this morning to find a proper torque for the Glock front sight screw. We measured the length of (2) different screws, brand new out of the box. Then measured the length of each screw after different torques. Here are my results: New: (1) .1172" long (2) .1172" long 5 in/lbs: (1) .1172" long (2) .1172" long 7 in/lbs. (1) .1173" long (2) .1174" long 10 in/lbs. (1) .1179" long (2) .1189" long 15 in/lbs. (1) .1205" long (2) .1210 long Note: We stripped out (2) different front sight hex drivers getting the bolts to 15 in/lbs. We recommend a torque of 5-7 in/lbs. You can achieve 5 in/lbs with only hand torque. We also recommend that you de-grease and red loctite the front sight screw when... Read more →


When we teach Red Dot Pistol courses we tend to see some interesting things. This is still a relatively new technology, and everyday we see new attempts into the market by companies both old and new. This last weekend we taught a class to 22 students. Of the 22 the majority were running Trijicon RMRs of varying types. We had three students using Leupold Deltapoints, and one SIG RX with a Romeo optic. It rained for about a third of the time and out experiences shooting these pistols in the rain was written up in a separate piece. Here are our learning points in no particular order. 1). You can shoot very accurately in the rain with a totally wet red dot. Sure its not as accurate as it would be in a dry and accommodating environment but hitting ten inch steel plates at 25 yards proved a non-issue. 2). There are four types of visual focus with these and the educated red dot shooter will use the correct one based on his needs and the problem at hand. Most... Read more →


This last trip home from Omaha Nebraska I began work on a book that will change the training world. I began writing the book based on the seminar series - Killing Within The Law. In writing the outline and in discussions with my staff of homicide investigators, we will inevitably have a chapter on weapons and what they may associate you with. I am not a believer that modified weapons will cause you grief like "you-know-who". In fact, we think a good shooting is a good shooting, that modifications to enhance accuracy and efficiency will never be an issue and the homicide investigators we are collaborating with agree. However, certain weapons may cast you in an unfavorable light during the initial police contact. Political designs might not be wise. An grey area example might be a slide festooned with skulls. Not that big a deal but do the police carry skulled weapons? A more drastic example might be the "You're F*cked" dust cover incident as one poignant example. How about the unregistered, no serial number, polymer home made receiver pistols... Read more →


Any gun will hit COM at ten yards...but our goal is retinal shots at that distance. Nuances in grip, how you sights, what portion of the eye you use to see the sights/dot, visual acuity, all contribute in the same way that a rifle zeroed for one man will not be perfectly zeroed for the next man. The iron sights do in fact have to be zeroed if you want something more than point shooting at an auto shop restroom. In class I have seen new pistols with the sights off for anything more than 10 yard COM shooting. Zeroing involves adjusting them for windage and elevation with YOUR MEAT AMMO at a given distance. Most important is windage. That can be done by drifting the rear sight. Elevation is not as crucial, but that can be done by shaving small amounts off the front sight or replacing the front sight. The zero will not be the same with Tula or WWB. I tell guys - zero for killing ammo, but note where your training ammo hits. Zeroing for training... Read more →


Last night I had dinner with a great old friend. He currently lives in Germany. Our friend is fluid in several languages, one of which is German and he focused on firearms training for that community while he worked for me...among other things. He told me a story about a student of his he had trained some years ago here in the USA. The student also lives in Germany, and has sufficient gravitas to have a concealed carry permit in that nation. Germany as you know is very restrictive in these areas and even toy guns are regulated. But the student's job was a high end time piece salesman, and was allowed to carry a weapon...as I said a very rare thing in that country. In any case - he was trained in a very fast-paced and intense few sessions in the Suarez system. A few years later, when opening the store in the early morning hours, he encountered three men that had apparently broken in during the night and were waiting for him. They pointed their pistols at him... Read more →