PISTOL GUNFIGHTING Feed

You heard them moving through the house. Anytime someone is attempting to maneuver in stealth against you, you can guess that their intentions are bad. And you did just that, arming yourself with your Glock. The light you added made you feel safer operating in low light, and that article you read said that all gunfights happened in the dark. You kept both hands on the Glock, just like on the range, and it helped steady the pistol through the waves of adrenaline. Remember, you told yourself - target identification is the most important thing so use the light. Not wanting to shoot an innocent, you had turned the light on with your support hand as you began to move through the house and - End of story - the bad guys saw your light and sent a magazine of ammunition your way. One of the thirty rounds hit you in the head and you died. Let's try again shall we? You heard them moving through the house. Anytime someone is attempting to maneuver in stealth against you, you can... Read more →


The topic is lights on handguns. Let’s discuss the why and how. The why is easy. A pistol mounted light is in place to illuminate possible adversaries and danger areas during a fight. There is no other reason to add one. If there is, please advise me in the comments. And no, “makes the pistol look cool on Instagram”, while it may be true is not a reason to add one. The how is a little more complicated as it involves not only operating the light, but also tactics for light use. On both I can speak with a solid level of experience since I was in no less than six direct gun battles at night in limited visibility situations, and the rest were in less than optimal lighting. First to establish immutable truths. And there are such truths – maybe not a concern on a clinical training range but certainly so on the street. 1). The trigger finger is for operating the trigger and nothing else while the pistol is in your hand. The trigger finger is not for... Read more →


I recall a pistol student I had many years ago. He was a kenjutsu aficionado. Kenjutsu, for those who missed that day, is the old martial version of japanese swordsmanship. In any case, after training he remarked on the similarity in concept of what I was teaching him and his sword studies. I'd never seen a true traditional early period Japanese sword form so I asked him to show me. Immediately he grabbed up a katana and demonstrated. He drew the sword, cut once and twice and sheathed. That was it. Astounded at the brevity, I asked him about it. He remarked that simplicity had a beauty and sophistication all its own. The old warriors did not need many complex methods, just a very few that they could pull off any time, any place, mindlessly, and with quickness and accuracy. Flash forward a few years to a conversation I had with a Suarez Staff member. He'd worked in the middle east in a PSD for many years. He related about the time when he worked with Gurkhas. Always a bladesman,... Read more →


It has almost become a cliche hasn't it? Bruce Lee's ethos of Jeet Kune Do (that is what Lee called his collective system of fighting). "Absorb What Is Useful". Sadly it has become an excuse for superficial dabbling and scanning rather than learning. After all...absorbing something only takes like what...fifteen minutes? Contrast that with the man the phrase is credited to. Lee did not give birth to himself as a martial arts icon, nor an actor. He studied a great deal. His main system - Wing Chun was a beginning, but Bruce did not dabble in that once a week. He immersed himself in it for years - longer than most casual western students would. It was the same for western fencing and bodybuilding and all the other aspects of building a combatant's body and mind that Lee studied. Contrast that with the superficial student, dabbling in something on a temporary basis, or worse, relying on a youtube clip for his training...and then exclaiming with a Lee-esque swagger that he has "absorbed" what was useful. Sorry kids...a superficial scanning of... Read more →


Although the Glock (and its emulative systems) tend to be the dominant pistol in the market, I am aware that not everyone selects or prefers it. I recently had a consulting contract where the shooters were using the SIG P226 (don't ask). To prepare I brought out some old DAs I had in the safe and began working with them. Nothing had changed. My first police semi-auto was a SIG P-226 way back in 1988. I shot Distinguished Expert with it and carried it for years. Later when the 3rd generation S&W was selected by the agency I worked with, I used that. It was like a rough Beretta 92. I took that weapon to Gunsite in 1990 and not only shot the top score in the class but won the shoot off against an entire relay of LAPD SWAT with their 1911s and several LAPD HITS instructors with their 92Fs. One could say I know a few things about the trigger system. We will be examining the DA concept to answer the needs of those who use it, and... Read more →


THE FEAR OF KILLING

I spend an hour every day scanning my news-feeds for information pertaining to "the business". The latest was one of the various editorials on the Georgia Tech shooting. Here is a video of the event - So in a nutshell, Scott “Scout” Schultz, 21, was confronted by officers while brandishing a knife on campus. He was ordered a number of times to drop the knife by officers. We can see in the video how the 'stand-off" developed and the exchange. I suspect the exchange was not about Scout Scott's sexual ambiguity, nor about the evils of the trump administration, but rather went something like ... Police: "Drop the knife" Suspect: "No"...and a couple of steps forward taken. Police: "I mean it...drop the knife NOW!" Suspect: "No"...and a couple more steps taken. Now I will tell you something and I really don't care if some liberal snowflake that will never spend a dime with me is upset. When you face an adversary...whether you are the police or Joe Citizen, the most important person in that event is you, not the suspect.... Read more →


I got this from one of our students recently. One of the things we do here in AZ is a student can send his ammo and firearms to avoid the hassle of traveling with them. So he asked - "300 rounds seems low to me for a round count for this course. If I order a case of a thousand, that will give us 500 each. What do you think?" My reply was what I always reply when asked about round counts. *** You can certainly bring more ammo and shoot more if you like and there is time. But I want to will tell you that in my classes I actually teach things. There are classes that are judged by the number of drills and the super high round count. One pistol class, I was told, had a count of 2,000 rounds per day. My class is not like that. The goal is to make you a better shooter and a better gunfighter. To expend ammo endless drills that will leave your skills exactly what they were when you... Read more →


I worked Gangs, Special Enforcement and a few other details that had my team and I "undercover" or at least wearing plain clothes. The job required that, as having a uniform on would have defeated the entire point of the exercise. But we knew that the moment we needed to engage the bad guys, we would either need to don some sort of attire that signified we were police. That either was a raid jacket with the words "POLICE" emblazoned on it in bright yellow, or a Point Blank SWAT vest with a badge and the word "POLICE" readily visible. The reason is that we did not want to be mistaken for other bad guys. As it was I got plenty of police guns pointed at me through the years I worked those details. But we knew that a criminal would more likely surrender to the police than to another thug that wanted to rob him. And, if the situation allowed it, we always tried to have a marked police unit with a couple of uniformed officers on hand should... Read more →


Suarez International is at the leading edge of modern gunfight training. We will be expanding our reach across America and will be hiring up to a dozen new staff to do so. We are looking for fit and capable teachers to instruct civilian pistol students at various skill levels. Military and police experience is a plus, as is prior teaching experience. Our current staff are among the highest paid trainers in the nation. Interested parties please submit a short 2-3 minute video resume to info@suarezinternational.com Read more →