PISTOL GUNFIGHTING Feed

First...the why...of course. A martial system is based on concepts, strategies, tactics. and techniques. One does not just "go fight", or "go shoot" as much as the simpletons of the American gun scene would have you believe. Fighting - whether hand or gun - is learned. Fighting must be mindless and automatic to bring victory. And for that to happen...it must be based on a series of accepted concepts that lead to a strategy of combat. And the tactics and techniques that are developed around such things must be physically memorized and trained until they can be done without analytical or conscious thought. For example, lets take our system of gunfighting. Not a theoretical matter at all, nor one based in sports. I have killed men with the things I teach you thus the system has not been diluted from the actual experience, nor been through as many clean hands as say...karate or kendo has. We define fighting by the assignment of initiative. Either you have it, and thus you begin and end the fight with nothing but timing and... Read more →


The first installment of this was quite contraversial, specially in the groups that uses competition shooting as a basis for gunfight training. Please understand that there is nothing wrong with sport shooting, but sport shooting is not gunfighting any more than collegiate fencing is street knife fighting. And to use one as a basis for the other is a recipe for ultimate failure. Now here is the thing that many forget. If you make a mistake on the game fields, what happens? Nothing. You shrug, hopefully get a redo, and try to ignore your friend's laughter. But if you make a mistake in a gunfight, which ostensibly is why you carry a pistol CCW, the results will be far more dire. So let's look at the situation. A bad guy pulls his pistol, points it at you and begins trying to kill you. If you do nothing, you are dead. If you try something and fail, you die. That's it. So, having been trained properly, you explode off the line of fire, pull your blaster and start trying to kill... Read more →


Novices concentrate on the "how" of something - Masters concentrate on the "why". You see it martial arts training all the time. Students in lines executing one movement or another, emulating the instructor. The same thing is seen in the firearms world. Lots of guys know "how" to - for example - reload the handgun, and they are spitting images of their instructor. But unless they understand "why" it is important to do it that way, they don't really know anything other than to mimic what somebody else has taught them. And it gets worse when that instructor didn't know either. Just as Karate's moves have applications that must be learned and understood, the same must be said about the far simpler martial science of pistol fighting. Often we will see somebody emulating a competition technique, or a technique that is workable only when you are a member of a team. The reasons for this usually end up with - "it looks cool". If that is the sum total of your goal in training - looking cool - or winning... Read more →


All combat systems, from archery to jujitsu, need to be blooded and tested if they are to true fighting systems rather than sports. The farther away from the combat experience a martial system becomes, the more stylized and artificial it becomes. Its advocates will relate how the "founder" did it way back during the war, although their own experience on the matter is based on third or fourth hand knowledge. The reader may not immediately see a problem with this. After all, not everyone can be a soldier or a cop, or even a street fighter. Moreover, many cops and soldiers never actually get combat experience, even though they may train for it. Those that do get it, many don't really know why they prevailed, and of those that do know, few feel compelled to teach others how to do so. Something else that happens is that a trainer may have had a number of contacts, but their scope and nature was limited to a particular environment. For example, consider the SWAT shooter that disdains all reactive point shooting because... Read more →


Remember this? With the information we received from Istanbul, Turkey and Jakarta, Indonesia, as well the inevitability of that happening here as the American Jihadists increase their skills and operational tempo, I developed the "Istanbul Drill". The Istanbul Drill teaches us to shoot for the face and neck area to quickly terminate the active shooter/terrorist, as well as to follow up the downed terrorist with additional face and neck shots to insure the result. As well, to prevent him from setting off an explosive device. Set up two targets. One standing...one already on the deck. Draw and fire a burst of five at the standing target...in the face of course. Instantly transition to the downed target (representing the same guy - now fallen), and put an additional burst of shots into his downed face. This is NOT a "street self defense against a mugger" technique. This is reserved for Active Shooter/Terrorist Events where the bad guy is quite likely to be wearing a bomb vest. You can argue against it if you wish, but you either accept or not accept... Read more →


I came into this study at a time in my life when I was not quite an American. My family and I arrived as refugees from Communist Cuba - victims of the communism so many foolish Americans seem to be embracing today. Having lost everything, home, wealth, and business, and likely on a government hit list, my father took his family and fled for America. There were no Cuban kids for me to call friends, and at a time when schoolyard fights were common, it was clear that I was not like every other kid in school. Karate was a physical language, and it demanded physical respect. I found where I belonged. That is what I liked about Karate. Success or failure was dependent on me, and not anyone else. If I failed, it was my fault. If I succeeded, it was my success. In karate there was no point in the silly practice of "blame assignment" that is so popular today. Starting in the fall of my tenth year, it consumed every moment of my day and every thought... Read more →