PISTOL GUNFIGHTING Feed

I recall a tour of a military museum in Europe a few years ago. We saw the evolution of the sword. First the Roman Gladius...perfect for its day and the tactics of its users. Then as mounted fighters became the norm the swords grew longer, and then wider and of better steel to deal with the prevalent armor. And then as the west grew more urban, and firearms made armor obsolete, the swords became easier to carry and more suited to street combat in urban Europe. Firearms shared a similar developmental path. Any visitor to the Cody Museum in Wyoming will see the same things. The west today - America specifically - is a world at war with itself. The identities of the left and the right are increasingly in conflict and historically, when such ideologies reach an impasses, compromise is impossible. Historically, one side will simply refuse to submit. The other side will either leave things as is and separate from them, or seek to force a unified submission. We surely recall the Symbionese Liberation Army, the Black Guerrilla... Read more →


A STUDY OF TEMPO AND TIMING The shooting range can only measure two things: speed and accuracy. But there are many more elements that cannot be measured there that are imperative to success in a gunfight. Timing and tempo being two others. When to strike is more important than how fast to strike. And how quickly to strike in relation to the enemy's actions is just as crucial. Unimportant issues on the sporting fields, with its start signals, and rules, but intensely important if the goal is to win by design, not merely survive by default. One important consideration is the timing of starting the fight. Not allowing the other man the opportunity to fully launch once you recognize the sequence of events. Musashi called this "Holding Down A Pillow" like smothering the attack. The other is how fast and how often do you need to hit him to end the fight. Once the initiative is seized, it cannot ever be relinquished or he will turn the table and kill you. The "limited violence" crowd doesn't understand this. The timing... Read more →


LOOK BEFORE YOU HOLSTER - II

SO! DO YOU SEE ANY PARALLELS TO THE PISTOL?? Following on the discussion of "look before you holster", here is an interesting video of real swordsmanship. There are striking parallels between Iaijutsu (the skill set of drawing and cutting reactively with the sword)...and gunfighting. The blade has different characteristics than the pistol. The firearm is dangerous because it can project force at a distance via the muzzle...but along with controlling the muzzle, one controls the trigger area. In fact, if one controls the trigger area...the control of the muzzle is really superfluous. The sword is dangerous at the point and the edge. Now...watch how the old master sheathes the sword. He controls the ridge...or the unsharpened edge. Once he has the point in the sheath, he sheathes...s-l-o-w-l-y. So we can say that the spirit of sheathing the sword is the same as the spirit of holstering the pistol, but because the dynamics of the weapons are different, the execution is different. That "spirit" is executed differently. With the sword, control of the ridge equals control of the edge. With the... Read more →


Looking At The Holster The issue is looking at the holster on the reholstering. I know....I know...we are told its bad its wrong, ect. But why? Let me lay my case out. 1). According to our research, half of all unintended discharges resulting in shooter injury occur during the holstering process. Sure...sometimes it is due to trigger fingers not being properly indexed, but there have been many times when it has happened due to some sort of obstruction in the holster, or misplacement of the pistol into the holster. 2). If the threat was still a threat, only a fool would be holstering his pistol. Read that again guys. Please enlighten me if there is any tactical reason to holster the pistol while facing a threat because I cannot think of any. 3). Often the police guys (I was once one) will say they have to holster to handcuff someone. That changes nothing. You do not point a gun at someone and then holster to handcuff. You hold them there, proned out, face down in the dirt, until your back... Read more →


I first began working with what is called “Appendix Carry” when two things happened concurrently. I jammed up my right shoulder doing overhead presses in the gym, and I began to work in some ground fighting Jujitsu into the skill sets (I hate ground fighting, but you never know right?) I had normally carried in the traditional 4:00/5:00 position, but now found my shoulder got very sore reaching back there. You know the story the doc tells you when you tell him it hurts to do something right? He usually says, “well stupid…don’t do that”. Moving the pistol forward of the hip fixed that right away. The other issue was that if I was fighting someone on the ground, it was exceedingly difficult to reach back to grab a pistol that was sandwiched between the ground and my body. Yet Appendix Carry still allowed me to do so. When we tried Appendix carry in our force on force drills we also found that it is very fast to draw from - faster than traditional strong side or crossdraw. And mind... Read more →


You heard them moving through the house. Anytime someone is attempting to maneuver in stealth against you, you can guess that their intentions are bad. And you did just that, arming yourself with your Glock. The light you added made you feel safer operating in low light, and that article you read said that all gunfights happened in the dark. You kept both hands on the Glock, just like on the range, and it helped steady the pistol through the waves of adrenaline. Not wanting to shoot an innocent, you had turned the light on with your support hand as you began to move through the house and - End of story - the bad guys saw your light and sent a magazine of ammunition your way. One of the thirty rounds hit you in the head and you died. Let's try again shall we? You heard them moving through the house. Anytime someone is attempting to maneuver in stealth against you, you can guess that their intentions are bad. And you did just that, arming yourself with your Glock.... Read more →


It seems that lessons need to be continually relearned because either they were never learned in the first place, or they were quickly forgotten due to inconvenience. The topic is weapon lights...and pistol lights in particular. They look very dramatic on those custom handguns in photos. We need to ask why they are there, and secondly if they are an asset on every single weapon. To answer the unasked question about my perspective and authority, all but one of the dozen gunfights I was involved with were in reduced light. The first issue is that if you do add a light, you need to know how to use it. I am always concerned about drawing fire by using a light excessively or inappropriately. If there was no concern over such things, we would simply turn the light on and leave it on like they do on TV Cop shows. I expect that most guys that add a light to their pistol, rifle or shotgun, will do just this and then vociferously defend their tactics online. The problem is that all... Read more →


As we know after the first double action shot is fired, the remaining shots are fired in single action...that is with a cocked hammer. One may well call...and it has been done...one of these pistols a self cocking pistol. In any case, in the early days a great deal was made of decocking. Specially so by the early SIG Sauer trainers (salesmen masquerading as shooting instructors) whose main adversary in the market was Smith and Wesson with its slide mounted safety/decocking levers. The story that the decocking levers were so easy to miss, and then the weapon would rendered inoperative, coupled with Copper's "don't get caught with your dingus down" helped fuels the fire for the SIG-esque decocking levers. Down and up was the mantra...even with Smith & Wessons. But as market-driven instructors pushed decocking ASAP, the lore of the DA pistol became one of "decock as soon as possible after firing". I am against that notion and never adhered to it. Here is my mantra - "Do not be a premature decocker". I recall when I "ran the walls"... Read more →


Back in the 1980s the triggers on SIGs and Berettas and S&Ws were heavier than today...or maybe we are stronger today. I don't know. I came to the DA Semi Auto from the DA Revolver so the first shot was not a big deal to me. One rolled through the trigger in one continual and constant motion on the way out and the shot broke just as the last sight verification was made. But we did work on those DA triggers quite a bit both in dry work and in the gunsmith shop. I tracked down a relatively unknown 'smith named Steve Deladio who ran the Armory at Long Beach Uniforms. He tuned my S&W 686 to ridiculous smoothness and when I used the S&W 5906 I did the same. Steve gave it a fantastic double action pull that could be rolled through like the best revolvers. I never knew that the first shot was so "difficult", or that the transition from double action to single action was such a "problem" until I attended Gunsite and was told as much.... Read more →