PISTOL GUNFIGHTING Feed

There is something called "a fighter's understanding". The many variables, tempos, intervals of time and distance, and nuances of the fight can take a lifetime to understand fully. Those who have been involved in combative disciplines for a lifetime know all about these. But as a teacher, I have to spend time putting these understandings and these nuances into words so to pass along the knowledge. And as I was working with the Junior Staff on his epee work recently I found myself having to verbalize these, as Sir Richard Burton called them, "sentiments of the sword". The fencing school we attend has not come to terms with the differences of classical execution, and fighting, or in this case, competitive applications. The footwork is different, the parries are different and many of the methods of setting up the attack are different as well. I have seen it all before, in Karate, and in the world of the gun. To see this dynamic again, in a totally different world, makes me think that there is some sort of developmental gap that... Read more →


Access and Concealment work against each other. The more access 9or speed of access) you want, the less concealment you must settle for. Conversely the more concealment you want the more you compromise access. And access doesn't mean some IPSC speed draw...it simply means getting the weapon in hand, quickly under duress and possibly while moving. Concealment is relative. You don't need an undercover operative overseas' concealment for every day life in normal America. I go about my life in AZ with either a Glock 17 or 19 under anything between a simple T-shirt to a polartec hoodie. I have no issues hiding a big pistol like this. Sure it requires some clothing choices, but like I have said for the last twenty years...the gun comes first...the clothing comes second. Do that and you will see what you can carry. Sadly, most people do the opposite and buy the pistol they can hide in their skinny jeans and justin Beaver t-shirt. That said, there are times when you compromise. Sometimes the social requirements might preclude large pistol carry but concealment... Read more →


Continuing with the discussions on marksmanship, an important pair of aspects are the issues of breathing and coordinating it with trigger press. One is strictly skill related, the other is skill and gear related. Breathing is a muscular action, whether voluntary or involuntary. The muscular action of breathing, or of holding the breath creates movement, which is the bane of a stable shooting platform. Not an issue in run-and-gun CQB, but a crucial consideration for accurate shooting anytime that a crucial shot is needed. In sniper school we teach the natural respiratory pause. And we find that method works admirably when shooting a pistol as well. We breathe normally...maybe taking a deep breath or two, and then allowing the air to expel naturally from the lungs without forcing it. At the point that the lungs feel "empty", you will have between 6 to 10 seconds of oxygenated blood flowing before the breathing must resume. Its during that period of time where, maintaining the visual focus on the sights or red dot, you begin pressing the trigger. That is the timing.... Read more →


Time for a perspective check. Every so often, the temptation returns to us all. It could be the Youtube video with the cool guy doing something really fast. It could be the competitive shooter running a stage. But the bug nibbles on your earlobe. "Gooooooo fassssssterrrrr". I have my opinions on this. I have read all the old time killers. Askins was the quintessential killer. I read everything about him. I think we would have been the best of friends actually. I have read Jordan. He is reported to have done some killing but nothing of record that I can find. And Bryce...he was quite the killer. And I worked with a great many killers in the old days. What all the killers shared as of the utmost importance was not speed. What the killers shared was not blinding speed. It was the ability to make a deliberate decision to kill that man standing there in front of them, diregarding whether that man be in the process of deciding what to do, drawing a weapon, or already have begun shooting.... Read more →


By Eric Tull In the firearms world, it’s supposedly common knowledge that an ankle gun is ideal for gun fights that go to the ground. Some quotes from popular instructors: “When you are down on your back, with a bad guy on top of you, your body weight is no longer pressing down on the legs, and your balance is no longer dependent on having two feet solidly on the ground. Your back is bearing your weight, and now it’s a piece of cake to snap your foot toward your hand and your hand toward your ankle, making for an extremely fast ankle holster draw.” “If you are on the ground when you go for the gun, the ankle rig can be handy.” “When you’re getting your a** kicked and you’re on the ground getting your a** handed to you, even at my age with all my busted up sh** I’ll carry an ankle gun because if they’re on top of me I’ll get the freaking gun out…” However, is it actually the case that an ankle gun is even... Read more →


This material is taught to security operatives and to law enforcement in the spirit of detecting "illegal" gun carry. I offer it here in the spirit of the fact that you should know who around you is also armed because their motivations may not be in favor of your interests. As well in the spirit of knowing what others may be looking for as well. If you know target indicators, you can avoid producing them. I am not even going to get into show-giving-away moves like wearing "gun clothing". Common Behaviors Security Check: Often those who are uncomfortable carrying weapons will touch and/or adjust the weapons on their bodies as the go through the day. This may be as subtle as a soft bump with the elbow, wrist or hand. Or it could be a distinct grasping of the weapon as they adjust it. The more comfortable the gun carrier is in their position of legitimacy, the less they might care about giving away the fact they are armed. Some carrying in a less legitimate manner might wish to security... Read more →


By Eric Tull A Suarez International Force on Force class is the single best class you can take to quickly improve your gunfighting skills. Simply put, it’s the closest you can come to real gunfight without having bullets whiz past your ear. But it’s true that the airsoft gear requirements and unconventional nature of the class can be a bit intimidating for potential students. To help overcome this, I’ve put together this guide to ensure new students get the most out of their first FoF class—and all the ones they take after that. (Because after you’ve taken one, there’s no going back.) GEAR YOU’LL NEED Quality Airsoft Gun and Magazines After taking a weekend off and spending good money on a class, you don’t want to have to sit out because your gear doesn’t work. You’ll need a quality gas-powered airsoft pistol. Do your own research on airsoft brands, but Tokyo Marui and KWA/KSC are an excellent starting point. You’ll also want three magazines for the gun, so you won’t have to reload as often (and also because magazines are... Read more →


You heard them moving through the house. Anytime someone is attempting to maneuver in stealth against you, you can guess that their intentions are bad. And you did just that, arming yourself with your Glock. The light you added made you feel safer operating in low light, and that article you read said that all gunfights happened in the dark. You kept both hands on the Glock, just like on the range, and it helped steady the pistol through the waves of adrenaline. Remember, you told yourself - target identification is the most important thing so use the light. Not wanting to shoot an innocent, you had turned the light on with your support hand as you began to move through the house and - End of story - the bad guys saw your light and sent a magazine of ammunition your way. One of the thirty rounds hit you in the head and you died. Let's try again shall we? You heard them moving through the house. Anytime someone is attempting to maneuver in stealth against you, you can... Read more →


The topic is lights on handguns. Let’s discuss the why and how. The why is easy. A pistol mounted light is in place to illuminate possible adversaries and danger areas during a fight. There is no other reason to add one. If there is, please advise me in the comments. And no, “makes the pistol look cool on Instagram”, while it may be true is not a reason to add one. The how is a little more complicated as it involves not only operating the light, but also tactics for light use. On both I can speak with a solid level of experience since I was in no less than six direct gun battles at night in limited visibility situations, and the rest were in less than optimal lighting. First to establish immutable truths. And there are such truths – maybe not a concern on a clinical training range but certainly so on the street. 1). The trigger finger is for operating the trigger and nothing else while the pistol is in your hand. The trigger finger is not for... Read more →