PISTOL GUNFIGHTING Feed

I came into this study at a time in my life when I was not quite an American. My family and I arrived as refugees from Communist Cuba - victims of the communism so many foolish Americans seem to be embracing today. Having lost everything, home, wealth, and business, and likely on a government hit list, my father took his family and fled for America. There were no Cuban kids for me to call friends, and at a time when schoolyard fights were common, it was clear that I was not like every other kid in school. Karate was a physical language, and it demanded physical respect. I found where I belonged. That is what I liked about Karate. Success or failure was dependent on me, and not anyone else. If I failed, it was my fault. If I succeeded, it was my success. In karate there was no point in the silly practice of "blame assignment" that is so popular today. Starting in the fall of my tenth year, it consumed every moment of my day and every thought... Read more →


The birth of our reactive shooting methods began on a cold and rainy December night, in 1991. It was December 7th, the 50th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor...it was cold, and raining, and I felt like crap. I had been fighting a cold for a week and it was finally taking hold. I remember standing over the phone, actually holding the receiver and debating whether to call in sick or not. (This was long before smart phones millenials would use today). As it turned out, I popped a couple of Day Quills and drove in to work. My plan was simple. I would get a nice hot Starbucks, a copy of the latest Investor's Business Daily and hang out in the heated car until I got a radio call. I was not in the mood for that "proactive police work" we hear about...not that day...not the way I felt. And it was all going according to plan too. Then at about 2345 HRS I got the call. "3L7 respond, any unit to assist, Armed Robbery in Progress,... Read more →


I was asked how the Suarez material differs from the Modern Technique invented/codified by Jeff Cooper. Here it is...a long read, but it sets down the historical context. I attended Gunsite in 1990. Cooper was there as were a few of the current "stalwarts" for the modern technique, a couple of SEALs and an entire group of LAPD SWAT with 1911s. I was running my issued weapon, as crappy as it was, a Smith & Wesson 5906 that had been tuned up by Steve Deladio in Long Beach, CA. While I was open minded, I did have some ideas about what was what since I had been working around criminals, gang members and killers for five years. I had not been in a gunfight yet, but I was around alot of guys who had. In the end, I got top score and won the shootoff, against all of those guys. Cooper and I became friends, and I attended Gunsite every year until 1995. So one could say I became well versed in the Modern Technique. In Cooper's words in the... Read more →


THE ISTANBUL DRILL With the information we received from Istanbul, Turkey and Jakarta, Indonesia, as well the inevitability of that happening here as the American Jihadists increase their skills and operational tempo, I developed the "Istanbul Drill". The Istanbul Drill teaches us to shoot for the face and neck area to quickly terminate the terrorist, as well as to follow up the downed terrorist with additional face and neck shots to insure the result. Set up two targets. One standing...one already on the deck. Draw and fire a burst of five at the standing target...in the face of course. Instantly transition to the downed target (representing the same guy - now fallen), and put an additional burst of shots into his downed face. The Instabul Drill has brought up a great deal of discussion at warriortalk.com about what some call "anchoring shots". The original term referred to a big game hunting technique one would find discussed in books by Roark and Capstick. The concept is similar, but the application is very different. In the hunting genre it was intended to... Read more →


I recall a tour of a military museum in Europe a few years ago. We saw the evolution of the sword. First the Roman Gladius...perfect for its day and the tactics of its users. Then as mounted fighters became the norm the swords grew longer, and then wider and of better steel to deal with the prevalent armor. And then as the west grew more urban, and firearms made armor obsolete, the swords became easier to carry and more suited to street combat in urban Europe. Firearms shared a similar developmental path. Any visitor to the Cody Museum in Wyoming will see the same things. The west today - America specifically - is a world at war with itself. The identities of the left and the right are increasingly in conflict and historically, when such ideologies reach an impasses, compromise is impossible. Historically, one side will simply refuse to submit. The other side will either leave things as is and separate from them, or seek to force a unified submission. We surely recall the Symbionese Liberation Army, the Black Guerrilla... Read more →