RIFLE GUNFIGHTING Feed

I invented the Glock PDW. That is a point of history. But it is not "the one true ultimate weapon created by the god of war". I find the ongoing desire to get , just the one gun, as ridiculous. Ask me what the best gun is and I will ask you what you want it for. Just as knife is not better than a spoon and a spoon not better than a fork, it depends on what you are intending to do. Thus there is, as Musashi once wrote, a time and a place for each weapon. A learned warrior selects the one best suited for what he expects to face. So now we discuss the SMG. (And word-nazis...I completely understand the actual SMG (submachinegun) is a selective fire weapon and these are not. I don't care...I call assault rifles by their original German name translated into English - thus "Assault Rifles", and I call these weapons "Submachineguns". If that offends anyone, go read another blog. Moving on.) Is it better than the Glock PDW? No. Is the Glock... Read more →


While in Czech Republic some years ago we had an opportunity to play with several Czech weapons from SMGs to full-size Machineguns. Very cool what you can really do at a former "secret soviet base" in a former communist nation that is now free. The first submachinegun we worked with in Czech Republic was the infamous Skorpion VZ-61 SMG. "Infamous" due to its use by several terrorist groups around the world. Carlos The Jackal was quite fond of it as I recall. This due to its concealability (no bigger than the typical IPSC game gun), and its controllability. Take a close look at the photo. You will see six shots being fired on full automatic. The brass cases are in the air or being extracted. Notice also the total lack of any muzzle rise at all. We were treated to the "song of the Skorpion". The weapons burns though a stick so quickly that one can hear the whistle sound of the brass cases falling back to earth after the last shot is fired. The VZ-61 is an interesting little... Read more →


Few guys today will remember those heady days in Los Angeles. It was early 1992, and the focus of everything in the news and on television was the violent arrest of Rodney King. King, a known Altadena Bloc Crip Gangmember, became the rationale for a week of rioting in April of that year. Known today as the LA Riots. It was a violent time, and for young hard charging officers, it was a great time to be on the job. If you were in a Special Enforcement Unit, it was the time you would always recall as the busiest and most active part of your career. We heard stories of LA Gang members targeting officers off duty, on their way home or to work. We heard of road blocks set up by those same people. As much as the political officials and police administrators wanted to ignore it, we were facing an insurgency. At the time, the agency I worked for was very strict with weaponry for Special Enforcement. We had access to many things, but controls were tight and... Read more →


Ask any student of small arms to name the most typically American rifle and chances are that they will name the .30-30 lever action rifle. Manufactured for over a century by Marlin, Winchester, and others - the lever action invokes images of the Old West. We see Jimmy Stewart in "Winchester '73" smiting the enemies of justice and freedom with his "repeater". We see John Wayne admonishing his adversaries to "fill their hands" as he gallops forward, a stubby Winchester in each hand. And, of course, we see photos of that most American of presidents - Theodore Roosevelt wielding his lever action against all manner of beasties in Africa. This ubiquitous and understated weapon has played a very major role in this country's history. Today the lever action is most often seen in the hands of close range deer hunters as a brush gun. It is not likely to be the first weapon that comes to our minds when the talk turns to fighting. But make no mistake friends, as a fighting (anti-personnel) weapon, the lever action is just as... Read more →


At the risk of starting another caliber war, I want to answer a question that several members have asked. In essence: Why would we pick a 9mm like the Glock PDW or an AR-15 in 9mm when we can have a 5.56x45? Well...it is a valid question and I will give my perspective on this based on 32 years of experience going into harm's way as well as teaching those who go into harm's way. Every weapon is a special weapon with a specific application. There are no weapons that handle every possible combat task equally well, and any choice is an exercise in compromise. While we all have personal preferences, the professional, or professionally-minded enthusiast should not have a "favorite weapon". Rather he should be skilled at a variety of weapons so that given some forethought and planning, he can select the best tool for the job. Now lets recall the concept of the PDW and its pseudo-official definition: A personal defense weapon (PDW) is a class of compact magazine-fed, self-loading, hybrid between a submachine gun and a carbine.... Read more →


The liability freaks online are already giving birth to multiple calves about this. So here is my educated and experienced perspective on the case. Synopsis: Couple of drunks point a BB gun out a hotel window. Someone sees it and calls the police. Police get a man with a rifle call and respond. Drunks don't cooperate and one of them gets shot. That is it in a nutshell. Now to the fine points. 1). About 9 p.m., Shaver, the 26-year-old suspect, took the rifle out and adjusted its scope like a “Pictionary toy from the ’80s” with Nunez. The men were standing at the window, facing south, and began pointing the rifle out of the window, Portillo told police. 2). Outside, in the ground-floor pool area, a husband and wife in the hot tub noticed someone holding a gun from a fifth-floor window, the records said. Startled, they rushed into the lobby to tell a clerk about what they’d seen. 3). "We've got some scared people," he said. "A couple of the guests – I’m an employee – they’ve come... Read more →


At the risk of starting another caliber war, I want to answer a question that several members at warriortalk.com posed. In essence: Why would we pick a 9mm like the Glock PDW when we can have a 5.56x45 SBR? Well...it is a valid question and I will give my perspective on this based on 32 years of experience going into harm's way as well as teaching those who go into harm's way. Every weapon is a special weapon with a specific application. There are no weapons that handle every possible combat task equally well, and any choice is an exercise in compromise. While we all have personal preferences, the professional, or professionally-minded enthusiast should not have a "favorite weapon". Rather he should be skilled at a variety of weapons so that given some forethought and planning, he can select the best tool for the job. Now lets recall the concept of the PDW and its pseudo-official definition: A personal defense weapon (PDW) is a class of compact magazine-fed, self-loading, hybrid between a submachine gun and a carbine. The name describes... Read more →


Handstops have been in existence in the shooting world for years. They have been used as the name implies - for short weapons, placed in a way to prevent the hand moving forward of the muzzle, or as barricade points to hold against cover while shooting. I put one on my Mk18/Commando, intending to use it as a hand stop. Now I have been fencing Epee for a while now and I immediately saw some parallels in the feel of these "hand stops" with the pistol grip on my Leon Paul Epee. The epee pistol grip (otherwise known as the anatomical or orthopedic grip) was originally developed for a 19th century Italian fencing master, L.Visconti. Visconti had lost some fingers in some sort of mishap, and had the grip designed to enhance the leverage of those he had left. This grip has become popular among sports fencers in the late twentieth century because of the way it enhances a fencer's lateral strength for the parry (block), complements the agility and athleticism of competitors. In high-level fencing, pistol grips are used... Read more →


SKIPPING BUCKSHOT…AND OTHER PROJECTILES I learned to do this back in 1986. It had been used in gunfights by the L.A. Sheriff's Deputies several times and a viable tactic. This was the age before lawyers wrote qualification courses and Internal Affairs guys were in charge of tactical training. Before the silly statement was spoken in fear, "every bullet has a lawyer attached to it", and the death before litigation culture became the norm. Today, I don’t know of any private or public sector schools teaching this actively. I know that we teach it and make it a common activity in our shotgun classes unless the surface simply doesn’t allow for it. The discussion is on using the ricochet effect, particularly with buckshot, to our tactical benefit. In the old days before tactical-speak, it was called “skip shooting”. It can be used with any projectile to a degree, but I learned it, and it is easiest to pull off, with buckshot. Buckshot pellets are not "soft and bouncy" like a rubber ball, so most of the momentum perpendicular to the surface... Read more →