RED DOT PISTOLS Feed

When Suarez International began the study of the Red Dot Pistol in 2009 I had no idea that it would become such a popular and mainstream idea. And yet today, almost a decade later, we are seeing more pistols with red dots than pistols without them. I predict that it will be a rare thing to see a pistol in a combatant’s holster that does not have a red dot as a sighting system. However what invariably happens is a desire to shortcut the system, and to get the benefits on the cheap. With that we see the proliferation of low quality red dot sights mounted on pistols. And by “low quality” I mean sights whose greatest attribute is that they are cheap. But “cheap” never brings quality. Now I understand very well that not everybody can drop $500 on an optic but an optic on a handgun that will be carried 24-7 in a holster is vastly different than an optic on a rifle that will sit in the safe until the weekend. Weapons meant for fighting (or “self-defense”... Read more →


Any gun will hit COM at ten yards...but our goal is retinal shots at that distance. Nuances in grip, how you sights, what portion of the eye you use to see the sights/dot, visual acuity, all contribute in the same way that a rifle zeroed for one man will not be perfectly zeroed for the next man. The iron sights do in fact have to be zeroed if you want something more than point shooting at an auto shop restroom. In class I have seen new pistols with the sights off for anything more than 10 yard COM shooting. Zeroing involves adjusting them for windage and elevation with YOUR MEAT AMMO at a given distance. Most important is windage. That can be done by drifting the rear sight. Elevation is not as crucial, but that can be done by shaving small amounts off the front sight or replacing the front sight. The zero will not be the same with Tula or WWB. I tell guys - zero for killing ammo, but note where your training ammo hits. Zeroing for training... Read more →


In essence: Why would we pick a 9mm, like the Glock PDW or Czech Scorpion, when we can have a 5.56x45? Well...it is a valid question and I will give my perspective on this based on 32 years of experience going into harm's way as well as teaching those who go into harm's way. Every weapon is a special weapon with a specific application. There are no weapons that handle every possible combat task equally well, and any choice is an exercise in compromise. While we all have personal preferences, the professional, or professionally-minded enthusiast should not have a "favorite weapon". Rather he should be skilled at a variety of weapons so that given some forethought and planning, he can select the best tool for the job. Now lets recall the concept of the PDW and its pseudo-official definition: A personal defense weapon (PDW) is a class of compact magazine-fed, self-loading, hybrid between a submachine gun and a carbine. The name describes the type's original role: as a compact but powerful defensive weapon that can be carried by troops behind... Read more →


There are a couple of points we must make at the beginning of this discussion. First: Nothing is perfect, and nothing is free. All weapons and sighting systems are designed and fabricated by men and anything man-made can, under certain circumstances, fail or malfunction. Certainly, more robust systems could be made, but everything is driven by the desire for profits. Something absolutely damage and failure proof could be made, but the cost would undoubtedly limit the market. Second: One is none, two is one. And by extension, three is better than two. Redundancy may be undesirable in conversations and essay’s, but not in weaponry or safety systems. The topic of this discussion is the laser. And more completely, its role and application today, in 2017, in the heyday of the red dot equipped pistol. It is interesting to note that many in the gun community foolishly polarize themselves into the “either – or” camps. But in reality, we will see that like the Reese’s commercial, they are two great things that work great together. Both systems will offer an easier... Read more →


CNC Machined in the USA of bar stock steel - Matte finished black ((Unlike other aluminum units on the market) Uses any sights made for Glock (sights not included) Sights can be zeroed independent of the red dot for true co-witnessing (Unlike other units on the market) Secured with precise cut dovetail slide cover plate - Includes rear slide cover plate, L-mount Can detail strip slide without removing the mount (Unlike other units on the market) Accepts any red dot sight (Unlike other units on the market) Optimal mounting height for suppressors - Compatible with most holsters. Fits all Glocks 9mm/40/357 SIG/45 ACP and 10MM (no 36, 42, and 43 models). AND UNLIKE OTHER UNITS ON THE MARKET - ONLY $79.99 L-Mount Version 2.0 from Suarez International on Vimeo. NOTE: L-MOUNTS ARE IN USE WITH BRITISH SBS OPERATORS, AND OTHER SPECIAL UNITS IN EUROPE Read more →


Is the Shield RMS or RMS-C the Trijicon-Killer? No, not at all. Neither is the Leupold Deltapoint for that matter. When we received the first RMS we installed it on a slide and ran it for a month in our testing. We carried it, we shot it, we used it in all sorts of ways a normal duty CCW weapon would be carried, and as a duty openly carried weapon would be carried an used. We did not abuse the weapon nor the optic. I will leave those S&M tactics to the clown princes of the gun world. I wrote up my findings in an article published on this blog and passed around in social media. Here is a more detailed description of my view on the Shield RMS. CHOOSING THE RIGHT RED DOT SIGHT 1). For a light to moderate duty optic to be carried concealed day-to-day, on a smaller sized pistol it is an excellent choice. Not the best choice however for a hard duty combat weapon that will be shot thousands of times per month and endure... Read more →