RED DOT PISTOLS Feed

On the face of it, the title seems obvious. Sort of like saying water is wet. But it is something that must be discussed in the realm of combat shooting as there seems to be a great deal of the "complacent quest for adequacy" creeping into the study. "Its good enough for gunfighting", one man may say as he views his pizza sized group on the cardboard, not taking into consideration that what he is viewing was not the result of an hour of busting off the x in reactive drills...but rather his best in non-pressured proactive group shooting. The combat crowd might scoff at our standards of all shots touching as an indicator of accuracy (both of man and gun and ammo). But the more accurate the shooter is, and the more accurate his weapon is, the greater a margin for error he has if things are less than optimal when he has to shoot. Think of a custom pistol that is capable of all shots touching at ten yards, compared to a pistol of lesser development that is... Read more →


Suarez International is at the leading edge of modern gunfight training. We will be expanding our reach across America and will be hiring up to a dozen new staff to do so. We are looking for fit and capable teachers to instruct civilian pistol students at various skill levels. Military and police experience is a plus, as is prior teaching experience. Our current staff are among the highest paid trainers in the nation. Interested parties please submit a short 2-3 minute video resume to info@suarezinternational.com Read more →


TORQUING FOR SIGHT SCREWS We tell the guys who ask to tighten "FINGER TIGHT". That means as tight as your man hands will allow. But the questions persist as well as guys leaving their sight screws looser than DC Opsec. So here we have the final word from the Dungeon. We did some testing this morning to find a proper torque for the Glock front sight screw. We measured the length of (2) different screws, brand new out of the box. Then measured the length of each screw after different torques. Here are my results: New: (1) .1172" long (2) .1172" long 5 in/lbs: (1) .1172" long (2) .1172" long 7 in/lbs. (1) .1173" long (2) .1174" long 10 in/lbs. (1) .1179" long (2) .1189" long 15 in/lbs. (1) .1205" long (2) .1210 long Note: We stripped out (2) different front sight hex drivers getting the bolts to 15 in/lbs. We recommend a torque of 5-7 in/lbs. You can achieve 5 in/lbs with only hand torque. We also recommend that you de-grease and red loctite the front sight screw when... Read more →


When we teach Red Dot Pistol courses we tend to see some interesting things. This is still a relatively new technology, and everyday we see new attempts into the market by companies both old and new. This last weekend we taught a class to 22 students. Of the 22 the majority were running Trijicon RMRs of varying types. We had three students using Leupold Deltapoints, and one SIG RX with a Romeo optic. It rained for about a third of the time and out experiences shooting these pistols in the rain was written up in a separate piece. Here are our learning points in no particular order. 1). You can shoot very accurately in the rain with a totally wet red dot. Sure its not as accurate as it would be in a dry and accommodating environment but hitting ten inch steel plates at 25 yards proved a non-issue. 2). There are four types of visual focus with these and the educated red dot shooter will use the correct one based on his needs and the problem at hand. Most... Read more →


Any gun will hit COM at ten yards...but our goal is retinal shots at that distance. Nuances in grip, how you sights, what portion of the eye you use to see the sights/dot, visual acuity, all contribute in the same way that a rifle zeroed for one man will not be perfectly zeroed for the next man. The iron sights do in fact have to be zeroed if you want something more than point shooting at an auto shop restroom. In class I have seen new pistols with the sights off for anything more than 10 yard COM shooting. Zeroing involves adjusting them for windage and elevation with YOUR MEAT AMMO at a given distance. Most important is windage. That can be done by drifting the rear sight. Elevation is not as crucial, but that can be done by shaving small amounts off the front sight or replacing the front sight. The zero will not be the same with Tula or WWB. I tell guys - zero for killing ammo, but note where your training ammo hits. Zeroing for training... Read more →


All new technology is resisted at first. The red dot pistol, or as the competition crowd calls it, "the carry optics pistol", is no different. When we first began milling dovetails for the Trijicon RMR in 2010 there was a great deal of resistance if not abject ridicule. But today we see a plethora of offerings using this concept. The resistance continues however on blogs and social media, parroting the same myth and superstitions about this weapon concept. One of those is that the red dot is not usable in the rain. Recently I was the guest of Rampart Training in Sedalia, Colorado to conduct our flagship course, Red Dot Combat Pistol. We had twenty two students, all accomplished shooters with backgrounds in police, military, concealed carry and competitive shooting sports. We conducted the same course we have conducted for the last few years, but in the middle of the second day, it began to rain. What a great opportunity to see for certain, what a red dot pistol is capable of in the real environment. The rain was constant... Read more →


Just as in rifle work, the most accurate shot will likely be from prone. But prone often created additional problems. Among them are that the terrain surfaces don't accommodate prone shooting. Urban terrain littered with broken glass and other injurious debris will not allow you to simply drop to the deck like on those videos. The need for elevation changes may exist, requiring you to shoot up or down from your spot. This is extremely difficult to do from prone. As well, intervening vegetation or structures may prevent a line of sight shot, requiring you to elevate your firing position. Many times the proposed answer to this is a kneeling position. You can do some good work in kneeling, but it has limits as well. The same surface terrain concerns exist as in prone. Yes, I know all the bearded guri (plural of guru) on youtube wear knee pads 24-7...even in the shower I suspect...but normal people do not. That means that dropping into the perfect kneeling position right atop a broken bottle, or a sharp piece of metal will... Read more →


Time for some heresy. For engaging a reactive threat's torso inside of five yards (fifteen feet), you do not need to use the sights at all. In fact, you are better off simply raising the pistol into the line of sight, pointing it at the chest, and pressing until he drops to the ground. We will wait for the collective gasps of the "sights all the time" tribe to subside, and so they can strike my name from the Raven's Book Of Life before we continue. Alright, all joking aside, when the problem calls for point shooting, you point shoot and the type of sights on the weapon are irrelevant. But when you do need extra refinement...which happens often enough, the sights are of great importance as they help you refine alignment as well as index carefully on target. So lets set down some points: The dot does not work WITH the sights. It works independently of the sights. Think of the iron sights and the red dot like two distinct and separate sighting systems. You do not need one... Read more →