RED DOT PISTOLS Feed

The discussion of the new "0.10" narrower RMS-C prompted the staff to do an updated study on optics for the Glock 43 system. Most optics are narrow enough to fit, but too long. The width on a 43 is such that it will accept any optic with a 1.0" width...maybe a 1.10" depending on the location of the screws. But the factory slide, with its rear sight placement limits use of certain optics because they will intrude excessively into the firing pin safety hole. Since placing the rear sight forward of the optic is a poor idea, the location of that dovetail becomes an important factor if designing a Glock 43 slide The RMR is too wide, but the Deltapoint is not, although the Deltapoint is too long. We have fit the Vortex Venom (and thus a Fastfire fits as well), Docter, J-Point, Shield RMS. There may be others we have not tried. Again, the limiting factor is the rear sight dovetail. When we bring out our Suarez Signature Glock 43 slides, that will not be an issue and any... Read more →


Continuing with the discussions on marksmanship, an important pair of aspects are the issues of breathing and coordinating it with trigger press. One is strictly skill related, the other is skill and gear related. Breathing is a muscular action, whether voluntary or involuntary. The muscular action of breathing, or of holding the breath creates movement, which is the bane of a stable shooting platform. Not an issue in run-and-gun CQB, but a crucial consideration for accurate shooting anytime that a crucial shot is needed. In sniper school we teach the natural respiratory pause. And we find that method works admirably when shooting a pistol as well. We breathe normally...maybe taking a deep breath or two, and then allowing the air to expel naturally from the lungs without forcing it. At the point that the lungs feel "empty", you will have between 6 to 10 seconds of oxygenated blood flowing before the breathing must resume. Its during that period of time where, maintaining the visual focus on the sights or red dot, you begin pressing the trigger. That is the timing.... Read more →


Which one? Well, it depends. To simply suggest you always do it the same way regardless shows a complete lack of understanding about the fundamentals of marksmanship. So unless you can guarantee that all your gunfights will be in elevators with obese aggressors, read on. The question of sighting with with one eye or two eyes while shooting has been around for a long time. As in much of what we are doing, it is a matter of context and distance. If you are fighting a bad guy at five feet as you explode off the x, intent on shooting him to the ground, keeping both eyes open and focusing on the threat will work fine. Try the same thing at 7 yards, shooting past an innocent, and your results will not be as good. As most things, it depends on the problem at hand. Like degrees of movement (from stationary to sprinting), the use of the pistol's sights (from focus on sights to focus on threat), the rate of fire (from carefully pressing the trigger to machinegun mashing it... Read more →


On the face of it, the title seems obvious. Sort of like saying water is wet. But it is something that must be discussed in the realm of combat shooting as there seems to be a great deal of the "complacent quest for adequacy" creeping into the study. "Its good enough for gunfighting", one man may say as he views his pizza sized group on the cardboard, not taking into consideration that what he is viewing was not the result of an hour of busting off the x in reactive drills...but rather his best in non-pressured proactive group shooting. The combat crowd might scoff at our standards of all shots touching as an indicator of accuracy (both of man and gun and ammo). But the more accurate the shooter is, and the more accurate his weapon is, the greater a margin for error he has if things are less than optimal when he has to shoot. Think of a custom pistol that is capable of all shots touching at ten yards, compared to a pistol of lesser development that is... Read more →


One very important visual skill the red dot pistol shooter needs is to learn the "Visual Hand Off". This is a term we use to describe what happens with the eyes as a shooter new to the red dot system is learning to use it. On a rifle, the head and eye is automatically positioned to pick up that red dot as the rifle is brought into the shoulder. A pistol however, floats in space, held there by the two hands. There is no third and fourth point of contact to place the eye correctly. Regardless of the uniformity of your draw, if your eye is not in the visual cone of the red dot, you will not pick it up...nor the sights for that matter. The way to solve this is with the use of the back up iron sights, and we insist that they need to be placed in the traditional positions on the slide. It is best to look for the iron sights FIRST. Especially with contorted field shooting positions or from positions required for using cover... Read more →


Here is the reality. Technology magnifies our ability. Technology does not invalidate the "old ways", but it simplifies the process of accomplishing the mission.While we still develop the skill at map and compass, nobody can deny the advent of GPS makes navigation faster and easier. We maintain the old ways and skill for the event where technology fails, but that seldom happens. The "indian" without a proper arrow is as irrelevant as a great arrow being shot by an indian with shitty marksmanship skills. The notion that it is all about skill is wrong and the haven of the cheapskate. A great shooter will not do as well with a Lorcin 25 auto as with a red dot equipped pistol anymore than a NASCAR driver will do as well in a used AMC Pacer as with a finely appointed and tuned Saleen Mustang. And even if one's skill is still developing, it is far less costly to obtain a great piece of gear and then train to its level than to outgrow various marginal weapons. Some people will attain a... Read more →


The method most basic, for using a Night Vision Monocular in conjunction with a handgun goes like this. Hold the monocular in your support side hand and bring it up to your non-dominant eye. How close will be up to you, but understand that there is a glow given off by the unit and holding too far away will not only illuminate your face but also reduce your visual acuity through the unit. Adjust the optic so you can hold it as close as possible. This will remain in place as you move through the area. It is suggested that you attach a neck lanyard so that if you needed both hands free you could drop it on the lanyard and instantly be able to operate whatever you needed with the support hand without loss of the unit. When moving, you can bring the pistol into a compressed ready such as SUL, or a modification of SUL. This allows you to move efficiently without excessive exertion, or projection of the pistol into unknown areas. The main point to remember is... Read more →