THINGS TO LOOK FOR IN A SHOOTING INSTRUCTOR
DRAWING THE SUREFIRE STILETTO

FIRING PIN'S ROLE IN YOUR GLOCK'S SAFETY

1128181552

We made our own pins after our good friend and CT operator showed us a Glock factory pin with a broken tip.  I still have that pin as an example of what a MIM pin will eventually do.  But the tip is not the only thing that will wear.  The base, or leg of the pin is a crucial matter as well.  When that part wears, contact with the trigger bar will be diminished to the point the pistol becomes unsafe.  The first time I saw this happen was on a student's Glock 19 in Texas.  Using all factory parts, the old twenty-five cent trigger job gave him a Glock that emptied the magazine in one trigger press.  A perusal of the internals revealed minimal contact between bar and striker.

Glock does not give a timetable of parts replacement, but they should.  Just like the oil should be changed every 4000 miles and the tires changed periodically on your car, there should be some periodic checks and parts replacement on your striker fired pistol.  Nothing lasts forever no matter what the manufacturers imply.  In the coming weeks we will try to establish a realistic timetable of periodic checks and parts replacement for the Glock system. 

Here are some images -

This Glock has all factory internals.  No Suarez parts at all, and has had about 10,000 rounds as a loaner pistol.  Look at the minimal engagement between the trigger bar and the factory striker.  Also, look at the rounded wear characteristics of the bottom edge of the factory MIM striker.  In my opinion, this sacrifices safety and should be replaced.



This is the same Glock with the same internals but a Suarez Steel firing pin.  100% engagement with no loss of desirable trigger characteristics.



Average length of the striker leg that engages against the trigger bar -

Average Factory Glock MIM Part - 0.249"

Average Suarez Milled Steel Striker - 0.257"

More to follow soon

Comments