RED DOT PISTOLS Feed

RED DOT - COUNTER TERROR DRILL & TARGET

THE TARGET - Printed on a 8.5x11" sheet so the edges of the face target touch the edges of the sheet top, bottom and sides. THE DRILL - From the holster. RD/CT Pistol Qualification · 25 Yards: 3 Rounds to the body-4 seconds 2X- 6 rounds · 15 Yards: 3 Rounds to the body-3 seconds 2X-6 rounds · 10 Yards: (2 body, 1 brain)-3.5 seconds 1X- 3 rounds · 10 Yards: 3 Rounds to the face -3 seconds 1X- 3 rounds · 7 Yards: (2 body, 1 brain) -3 seconds 1X- 3 rounds · 7 Yards: 3 Rounds to the face -3 seconds 1X- 3 rounds · 5 Yards: (2 body, 1 brain)- 2.0 seconds 1X- 3 rounds · 5 Yards: 3 Rounds to the face -2.5 seconds 1X- 3 rounds · 3 Yards: (2 body, 1 brain)- 2.0 seconds 1X- 3 rounds · 3 Yards: 3 Rounds to the face -2.0 seconds 1X- 3 rounds · 10 Yards to 3 Yards-Shooting on the move-3 rounds body, 3 rounds face 2X 14 rounds total. Course is a total of 50... Read more →


Simply out of curiosity, we held a one day Double Action Pistol Training Day here in Prescott. As expected, a one day specialty deal like this didn't yield the usual twenty students with a waiting list. We had seven students with some additional staff and myself for about ten shooters. We spent a few hours tuning up the DA/SA concept. We discussed the nature of the DA and how to use it effectively. Then we worked on accuracy from 5 yards out to 100 yards. Finally we did some shooting drills my SWAT unit used as well as a few drills we learned from USMC SOTG when our unit attended their CQB school way back in the Paleolithic Era. These last were simply to show what was possible with a double action compared to the striker fired pistols most often seen today. We had mostly SIG pistols in the 226/229 variety with one Langdon Beretta, one Wilson Beretta and one HK P30L. Incidentally, we may do an article on this later. The HK P30L was a very nice pistol with... Read more →


I have a spot in my heart for the SIG P226. It was my first semi-auto duty pistol back in 1988. Coming from the world of revolvers, the SIG was like having stolen alien technology from the future in your holster. As a point of comparison, prior to the SIG, I went into battle every night with a revolver and three extra speed loaders (a whopping 24 rounds in total). With the SIG I had (with a third magazine on my belt) 61 rounds at my disposal. Additionally, while I shot Distinguished Expert (297-300) in the LASD quarterly qualification with the revolver, it took hard work. I did it easily with the P226 and the 4-pound single action trigger (there was no policy preventing single action usage). Some history. In 1975, SIG entered into an agreement with German gun manufacturer J.P. Sauer & Sohn to develop and market a new handgun which became the P220. The P220 was the first SIG Sauer handgun sold in the USA. It was marketed initially by Browning as the Browning BDA. The SIG Sauer... Read more →


When Suarez International began the study of the Red Dot Pistol in 2009 I had no idea that it would become such a popular and mainstream idea. And yet today, almost a decade later, we are seeing more pistols with red dots than pistols without them. I predict that it will be a rare thing to see a pistol in a combatant’s holster that does not have a red dot as a sighting system. However what invariably happens is a desire to shortcut the system, and to get the benefits on the cheap. With that we see the proliferation of low quality red dot sights mounted on pistols. And by “low quality” I mean sights whose greatest attribute is that they are cheap. But “cheap” never brings quality. Now I understand very well that not everybody can drop $500 on an optic but an optic on a handgun that will be carried 24-7 in a holster is vastly different than an optic on a rifle that will sit in the safe until the weekend. Weapons meant for fighting (or “self-defense”... Read more →


Ever since Glock made its debut into the LE world back in the late 1980s, there has been a quest to "perfect" its trigger. In truth, compared to many of the triggers on police pistols at the time, the Glock trigger was a huge advancement. But boy's being boys, the tinkering began. The quest seemed to take the path of making the triggers as light, and with as minimal take-up, as possible. Then with a good amount of judicious polishing, the officer ended up with a completely unsafe pistol, albeit with a wondrous trigger. And of course, since every Glock owner fancies himself a qualified gunsmith the moment they sign that 4473, the quest caught like chicken pox at a public school. TRIGGER MECHANICS - THE FEEL Now look...you can have a great trigger that is quite safe on a Glock, but you must accept that it will never have a trigger like a tuned 1911 or a single action revolver. But lets define the components parts of the trigger so you understand what is possible with a great Glock... Read more →


Any gun will hit COM at ten yards...but our goal is retinal shots at that distance. Nuances in grip, how you sights, what portion of the eye you use to see the sights/dot, visual acuity, all contribute in the same way that a rifle zeroed for one man will not be perfectly zeroed for the next man. The iron sights do in fact have to be zeroed if you want something more than point shooting at an auto shop restroom. In class I have seen new pistols with the sights off for anything more than 10 yard COM shooting. Zeroing involves adjusting them for windage and elevation with YOUR MEAT AMMO at a given distance. Most important is windage. That can be done by drifting the rear sight. Elevation is not as crucial, but that can be done by shaving small amounts off the front sight or replacing the front sight. The zero will not be the same with Tula or WWB. I tell guys - zero for killing ammo, but note where your training ammo hits. Zeroing for training... Read more →


In essence: Why would we pick a 9mm, like the Glock PDW or Czech Scorpion, when we can have a 5.56x45? Well...it is a valid question and I will give my perspective on this based on 32 years of experience going into harm's way as well as teaching those who go into harm's way. Every weapon is a special weapon with a specific application. There are no weapons that handle every possible combat task equally well, and any choice is an exercise in compromise. While we all have personal preferences, the professional, or professionally-minded enthusiast should not have a "favorite weapon". Rather he should be skilled at a variety of weapons so that given some forethought and planning, he can select the best tool for the job. Now lets recall the concept of the PDW and its pseudo-official definition: A personal defense weapon (PDW) is a class of compact magazine-fed, self-loading, hybrid between a submachine gun and a carbine. The name describes the type's original role: as a compact but powerful defensive weapon that can be carried by troops behind... Read more →